This Father's day Get 30% Off on All Chiro Sessions! Offer Valid 15th June to 22nd June, Book Now !
Physiotherapy For Stroke Patients

Physiotherapy For Stroke Patients – Does It Help?

Have you ever wondered how effective physiotherapy is for stroke recovery? Each year, millions of people worldwide suffer from strokes, which can leave them facing significant physical challenges. The journey to recovery is often long and requires various forms of therapy. Among these, physiotherapy plays a pivotal role. But how does it help those who have been through this life-altering event?

Welcome to Proremedy Physiotherapy Mississauga, where we specialize in tailored physiotherapy services for stroke survivors. Our dedicated healthcare team is committed to aiding patients to regain their independence and improve their quality of life. At Proremedy Physio, we understand that each stroke survivor’s path to recovery is unique, and our treatment plans reflect this individuality.

From the innovative uses of virtual reality in treatment to the basic exercises that can help regain lost motor skills, we’ll cover the essentials that every stroke survivor and their loved ones should know.

What Are the Immediate Benefits of Physiotherapy After a Stroke?

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, preventing brain tissue from getting oxygen and nutrients, which can cause cells to die. Here are some benefits of physiotherapy for stroke survivors:

Regaining Lost Motor Skills

After a stroke, patients often face significant challenges in motor skills, which include basic movements that were once second nature. These exercises, which are the major physiotherapy purpose, aim to overcome the weaknesses of the patient. By repetitively practicing tailored movements, stroke survivors can improve their ability to perform daily tasks, thereby increasing their independence and confidence.

Improvement in Muscle Tone and Strength

Stroke includes developing hypotonicity and muscle weakness which makes stroke survivors unable to be involved in the most constant things. Muscle strength and muscle tone become accomplished all through the specific muscle activity and exercises that physiotherapy gives. Apart from the need for that movement itself, it is equally important in maintaining muscles without atrophy due to disuse.

Enhanced Mobility with Mobility Aids

Because stroke induces mobility problems for lots of victims, physiotherapy is one of the elements that helps here by merging the use of walkers, canes, and wheelchairs in the persons. The presence of these aids in the training is as important as making sure the patient is safe. Moreover, it can help enhance the range of motion of the patient, a factor that contributes to the buildup of confidence in patients.

Boosted Blood Flow and Health of Blood Vessels

The productive bloodstream is one of the vital issues people suffer from after a stroke. Regular physiotherapy exercises are one of the measures or techniques to maintain blood circulation which implies healthy blood vessels and a better recovery process. On one hand, the improved blood flow contributes to the function of the ischemic limbs, in addition, it helps in the faster recovery of tissues damaged in stroke.

Cognitive and Emotional Benefits

Recovering from a stroke isn’t only about physical recovery; cognitive and emotional aspects are equally important. The set of physiotherapy therapeutic exercises often involves cognitive processing which is very helpful in the recovery of neurological functions. Besides, hitting physical therapy goals and expectations may increase a patient’s confidence and mental well-being, which are both important for a full mental health recovery.

Also Read – 5 Exercises for Anterior Pelvic Tilt to Reduce Pain

Which Physiotherapy Techniques Help For Stroke Patients?

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT)

  • Encourages Use of Affected Limbs: CIMT is based on reducing the use of a functional limb while at the same time, the unaffected limb is kept restricted, forcing the patient to use the affected limb to overcome the loss of skill.
  • Reinforces Neural Adaptations: Through repetitive utilization of the afflicted limb, CIMT provides neuronal plasticity in the brain and this process helps patients regain the lost motor powers due to brain cell death.
  • Structured and Intensive: This rehabilitation is highly structured and needs substantial participation, all performed in sessions that span from several hours to several weeks. The improvement of this function in the limbs from left to right in the mentioned period brings about significant gains in terms of the functioning of these limbs as a whole.

Virtual Reality Therapy

  • Simulated Real-Life Scenarios: The use of virtual reality (VR) technology helps create virtual environments in which a stroke patient can play out daily tasks to improve their motor abilities as well as their brain functions in the safety of the simulator.
  • Immediate Feedback: VR has immediate feedback ability resulting in patients learning more easily, thus improving performance as they correct their movements in real time.
  • Engaging and Motivating: The use of game-based therapy in VR is meant to preserve patients’ attention and provide the motivation that is required for the success of the rehab program.

Aquatic Therapy

  • Buoyancy Reduces Stress on Joints: With the buoyancy of water pushing against the patient’s body, less gravitational pull is felt, which makes it possible to exercise without the joints being stressed out.
  • Resistance Improves Muscle Strength: Water creates some resistance that works to reinforce muscles, thereby building a firm muscle structure and increasing endurance.
  • Therapeutic for Balance and Coordination: Immersion in water helps to improve balance and coordination skills, specific consequences that can often arise with people suffering from neurological changes caused by a stroke.

Balance Training

  • Improves Stability and Coordination: The equilibrium training is exercises related to improving stability and coordination, thus reducing stroke survivors’ falls (which are a common occurrence for stroke survivors).
  • Customizable to Patient’s Needs: The intensity of exercises can be regulated with consideration of the individual patient’s needs and progress, hence the performance of exercises appears more versatile.
  • Incorporates Various Techniques: This training can include activities ranging from basic standing and shifting weight to more complex movements like walking on uneven surfaces or using balance aids.

Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)

  • Stimulates Muscular Activity: FES uses electrical currents to stimulate muscular activity in the affected limbs, helping to restore muscle function and improve motor skills.
  • Enhances Range of Motion and Strength: Regular use of FES can lead to improvements in range of motion and muscle strength, crucial for performing everyday activities.
  • Supports Neurological Recovery: By activating the muscles through electrical impulses, FES can also encourage neurological recovery, potentially leading to lasting improvements in motor control.

Wrapping it up!

In conclusion, the aim of physiotherapy as a rehabilitation after a stroke is to run a vigorous procedure that eventually reintegrates stroke patients into daily life. Physiotherapy plays a huge role in rehabilitation of the patients suffering from acute stroke, thanks to the number of physical exercises, especially for upper extremities, and extra efforts to counterbalance the disorders.

In addition to that, it indicates the relevance of a healthy diet as a component of integrated treatment build. The main goals of physiotherapy can be summarized as to help stroke patients get back to their normal living state, but also to boost their well-being.

Picture of Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Arpan has been practicing as a physiotherapist since 2010, starting her career in a trauma center in India where she worked with post-traumatic and post-operative cases. She moved to Canada and continued her independent practice, specializing in musculoskeletal, orthopaedic issues, sports injuries, and pelvic health physiotherapy. She has experience dealing with MVA and WSIB clients and has been working in the Mississauga community since 2015.

Picture of Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Arpan has been practicing as a physiotherapist since 2010, starting her career in a trauma center in India where she worked with post-traumatic and post-operative cases. She moved to Canada and continued her independent practice, specializing in musculoskeletal, orthopaedic issues, sports injuries, and pelvic health physiotherapy. She has experience dealing with MVA and WSIB clients and has been working in the Mississauga community since 2015.

×