Physiotherapy facts

7 Facts about Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy

Pelvic floor physiotherapy (PFPT) is an aspect of physiotherapy that focuses on examining and treating pelvic floor muscles. These essential muscles are situated between the hip bones and the sacrum, acting as a supportive “bowl” for the bladder, colon, and uterus. PFPT involves both internal and external evaluation to identify any dysfunction or weakness in the pelvic floor muscles. By addressing issues such as incontinence, pelvic pain, and organ prolapse, PFPT aims to restore strength, function, and overall well-being. This personalized approach combines targeted exercises, manual therapy techniques, and lifestyle modifications to empower individuals in optimizing their pelvic health.

How does it work?

A pelvic floor physiotherapist undergoes specialized training to assist individuals in strengthening and rehabilitating their pelvic floor muscles. Conversely, an endocrinologist specializes in the hormone system, offering expertise in diagnosing, treating, and managing conditions related to hormones, such as thyroid disorders and menopause symptoms. These professionals play a vital role in providing targeted care and support for those facing hormonal imbalances or specific health issues associated with hormones. By leveraging their extensive knowledge and skills, pelvic floor physiotherapists and endocrinologists contribute to the overall well-being of their patients.

What are pelvic floor disorders?

Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) encompass a range of issues, including bladder control problems, bowel control problems, and pelvic organ prolapse.

  • Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the bladder, urethra, cervix, or rectum descend due to weakened support in the vagina. In severe cases, women may experience the protrusion of bulging tissue through the vaginal opening.
  • Bladder control problems involve difficulties such as the urge to urinate uncontrollably (urge incontinence), frequent urination throughout the day and night (urge frequency), and urine leakage triggered by increased abdominal pressure (stress incontinence). These symptoms are also associated with overactive bladder.
  • Bowel control problems refer to the loss of normal bowel control, leading to constipation or fecal incontinence (FI). FI, which involves the unintentional leakage of solid, liquid stool, or gas, is also known as anal incontinence (AI) or accidental bowel leakage (ABL).
  • Pelvic floor disorders can significantly impact an individual’s daily life and well-being, and seeking appropriate medical attention is crucial for effective management and improved quality of life.

Here are the 7 unknown facts about pelvic floor physiotherapy

In our pursuit of physical fitness, we often neglect an essential part of our bodies – the pelvic floor. This often-overlooked area plays a vital role in numerous functions. Whether it’s due to pregnancy, childbirth, accidents, pelvic surgeries, or chronic illnesses, our pelvic floor can be impacted without us even realizing it until weakness sets in. Thankfully, there’s a solution: pelvic floor physiotherapy. This specialized therapy seeks to assist you in overcoming these shortcomings and regaining control of your life for healthy living. 

Now, let’s dive into seven eye-opening facts about pelvic floor physiotherapy that will broaden your understanding and awareness of its benefits.

  • Your pelvic floor is a part of your core
     The core muscles encompass more than just a muscular physique attained at the gym. They consist of a deep network of internal muscles, including the pelvic floor, that work collectively to enable fluid body movements. These interconnected muscles, such as the diaphragm, transversus abdominis, multifidus, and pelvic floor, function like a well-oiled machine. If one muscle fails to function properly, it can disrupt the entire system. Therefore, during a physiotherapy assessment, the functionality of the pelvic floor muscle is carefully examined as it can have significant repercussions on the body as a whole. Additionally, the pelvic floor muscle provides support to vital pelvic organs, including the bowel, bladder, uterus (for women), and vagina, and contributes to reproductive and excretory functions.
  • Pelvic floor physiotherapy is supported by research:
    Extensive research on pelvic floor physiotherapy has yielded positive outcomes, leading to its widespread adoption in physiotherapy clinics across Hamilton and Canada. Studies demonstrate that pelvic floor physiotherapy is a safe and effective approach to addressing pelvic floor dysfunction. Promising results indicate its potential in treating hypotonic and hypertonic pelvic floor disorders during the peripartum and postpartum periods, instilling hope for further positive research in this field.
  • Prioritize Your Pelvic Floor Essential for Pregnancy and Postpartum: 
    Dispelling a common myth, pregnancy and childbirth do not result in a permanent change to the pelvic floor. However, it’s crucial to address any potential pelvic floor dysfunction for optimal health and functionality. Untreated issues can worsen over time, making it essential to seek professional help from a physiotherapist specializing in pelvic floor care. Pelvic floor physiotherapy has demonstrated promising outcomes, and it is advisable to seek an assessment if experiencing symptoms like urinary or fecal incontinence, lower back pain, pelvic pain, discomfort during sexual activity, or weakened core. Don’t hesitate to prioritize your well-being and break the stigma surrounding seeking help for these issues.
  • How Physiotherapy Can Release a Tight Pelvic Core:
    Addressing a tight pelvic floor is crucial as it can lead to symptoms such as constipation, painful intercourse, pelvic pain, and frequent urination urges. Treating a tight pelvic floor involves a similar approach to that of a weak pelvic floor, but it’s important to note that tightness does not equate to strength. The first step is to ensure the pelvic floor can relax to its basic resting tone before progressing to exercises targeting hypertonic muscles. Physiotherapy treatment typically involves techniques like biofeedback, diaphragmatic breathing, manual therapy, specific exercises, awareness programs, and relaxation techniques to alleviate tension in the pelvic floor muscles.
  • Both men and women require an effective pelvic floor:
    While it is commonly assumed that only women experience pelvic floor muscle issues, the truth is that anyone, regardless of gender, can be affected. Approximately 1 in 3 women will encounter a pelvic floor disorder in their lifetime, but men are not exempt from pelvic floor dysfunction. Men may face challenges such as erectile dysfunction, prostatitis, and urinary incontinence, while women may experience pain during sex, incontinence, or cystitis as a result of pelvic floor dysfunction. It is essential to recognize that pelvic floor issues can impact both genders and seek appropriate care for optimal pelvic health.
  • Weak pelvic floor can be improved with physiotherapy:
    A weak pelvic floor muscle can manifest in various symptoms, such as difficulty controlling the urge to use the restroom, tampons falling out, or unintentional passing of gas. Surgery is not always necessary to address this issue, as pelvic floor physiotherapy can often provide an effective solution. Our Skilled physiotherapists in Streetsville employ a range of techniques, including tailored exercise programs, biofeedback, medications, yoga, and complementary therapies, to strengthen and rehabilitate the pelvic floor muscles. Through a personalized treatment plan, pelvic floor physiotherapy offers a non-surgical approach to improving pelvic floor weakness and related symptoms

Conclusion:

In conclusion, understanding the importance of pelvic floor physiotherapy is crucial for both men and women. From addressing weak or tight pelvic floor muscles to alleviating symptoms such as incontinence or pelvic pain, pelvic floor physiotherapy offers a non-invasive and effective treatment option. Remember that seeking professional help from a trained physiotherapist, like those at Proremedy, is essential for tailored treatment plans and guidance. By prioritizing pelvic floor health and utilizing the expertise of physiotherapists, individuals can regain strength, function, and overall well-being in their daily lives.

Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Arpan has been practicing as a physiotherapist since 2010, starting her career in a trauma center in India where she worked with post-traumatic and post-operative cases. She moved to Canada and continued her independent practice, specializing in musculoskeletal, orthopaedic issues, sports injuries, and pelvic health physiotherapy. She has experience dealing with MVA and WSIB clients and has been working in the Mississauga community since 2015.

Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Physiotherapist Arpan Hundal

Arpan has been practicing as a physiotherapist since 2010, starting her career in a trauma center in India where she worked with post-traumatic and post-operative cases. She moved to Canada and continued her independent practice, specializing in musculoskeletal, orthopaedic issues, sports injuries, and pelvic health physiotherapy. She has experience dealing with MVA and WSIB clients and has been working in the Mississauga community since 2015.

×